More than just a penny for your thoughts — $100,000 top bounty

SECURITY

Jeffrey Goldberg by Jeffrey Goldberg on

We believe that we’ve designed and built an extremely secure password management system. We wouldn’t be offering it to people otherwise.  But we know that we – like everyone else – may have blind spots.

That is why we very much encourage outside researchers to hunt for security bugs. Today we are upping that encouragement by raising the top reward in our bug bounty program.

Bugcrowd logo

We have always encouraged security experts to investigate 1Password, and in 2015 we added monetary rewards though Bugcrowd. This has been a terrific learning experience for both us and for the researchers. We’ve learned of a few bugs, and they’ve learned that 1Password is not built like the web services they are used to attacking. [Advice to researchers: Read the brief carefully and follow the instructions for where we give you some internal documentation and various hints.]

Since we started with our bounty program, Bugcrowd researchers have found 17 bugs, mostly minor issues during our beta and testing period. But there have been a few higher payout rewards that pushed up the average to $400 per bug. So our average payout should cover a researcher’s Burp Suite Pro license for a year.

So far none of the bugs represented a threat to the secrecy of user data, but even small bugs must be found and squashed. Indeed, attacks on the most secure systems now-a-days tend to involve chaining together a series of seemingly harmless bugs.

Capture the top flag to get $100,000

1Password golden flag

Our 1Password bug bounty program offers tiered rewards for bug identification, starting at $100. Our top prize goes to anyone who can obtain and decrypt some bad poetry (in particular, a horrible haiku) stored in a 1Password vault that researchers should not have access to. We are raising the reward for that from $25,000 to $100,000. (All rewards are listed in US dollars, as those are easier to transfer than hundreds or thousands of Canadian dollars worth of maple syrup.) This, it turns out, makes it the highest bounty available on Bugcrowd.

We are raising this top bounty because we want people really trying to go for it. It will take hard work to even get close, but that work can pay off even without reaching the very top prize: In addition to the top challenge, there are other challenges along the way. But nobody is going to get close unless they make a careful study of our design.

Go for it

Here’s how to sign-up:

  • Go to bugcrowd.com and set up an account.
  • Read the documentation on the 1Password bugcrowd profile
  • The AgileBits Bugcrowd brief instructs researchers where to find additional documentation on APIs, hints about the location of some of the flags, and other resources for taking on this challenge. Be sure to study that material.
  • Go hunting!

If you have any questions or comments - we’d love to hear from you. Feel free to respond on this page, or ping us an email at security@agilebits.com.

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